A LETTER FROM JOHN BERGER

During many years of professional work in the fields of renewable energy and environmental policy, I have been deeply concerned about the effects of human activities on the environment. My focus was originally on the environmental impacts of energy technologies.  After studying the energy options globally available, I was convinced by the mid-1970s that the most economically and environmentally sound way forward required the vigorous adoption of renewable energy and efficiency technologies. In the decades and books that followed, I strongly advocated for those technologies and for more intensive use of environmental restoration technologies to repair damaged natural resource systems.

Contact me at johnjberger2@gmail.com

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COMING SOON

 

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Climate Solutions: Turning Climate Crisis into Jobs and Prosperity will show that a massive clean-energy investment program will produce millions of new jobs over a decade while generating trillions of dollars in savings.

Such a program will also create a cascade of environmental, public health, and social benefits. Climate Solutions will show how these benefits would accrue to particular stakeholders. These beneficiaries would then be supportive of policies and investments needed to induce a swift energy transition and to help generate popular and political support for them.

Climate Solutions provides a vision for guiding the massive infrastructure investment program so it achieves a clean energy revolution, rather than being squandered on a conventional refurbishing of highways, bridges, tunnels, and the old energy economy. The book also conveys up-to-date information on cutting-edge renewable energy technologies and recipes for supercharging the American economy. In conclusion, Climate Solutions shows how, in pulling back from the brink of climate catastrophe, we can create prosperity, economic justice, and tens of millions of new jobs all over the world. It offers a practical roadmap to a prosperous, sustainable future.

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Netherlands Faces Climate Challenges And Struggles For Consensus


By John J. Berger
July 27, 2016
The Huffington Post

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Amsterdam, The Netherlands ― I visited the Netherlands in November of last year as part of a European research trip to learn more about European cities seen as “front runners” in the global effort to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions.  

Today, 55 percent of all people on Earth live in cities, and two-thirds of all people or more are expected to be city dwellers in just 34 years, when global population will swell to 9.7 billion, according to the UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs.

Therefore, unless the world’s cities are able to radically reduce their carbon emissions, it will be impossible for the world to keep greenhouse gas emissions from soaring to dangerous new heights.

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Sustainable Amsterdam — Port Embarks On A Clean Energy Transition


By John J. Berger
Aug. 3, 2016
The Huffington Post

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Amsterdam, The Netherlands — Change is coming to the Port of Amsterdam. The Port is seeking to become one of Europe’s most sustainable ports.

Competing ports are modernizing and these days, that means reducing their environmental impacts. So Amsterdam must do the same to remain competitive.

The Port is part of the World Port Climate Initiative, which launched in 2008 when 55 ports from around the world signed the World Port Climate Declaration at the encouragement of the C40 Climate Cities Leadership Group, with support from the Clinton Climate Initiative.

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Sustainable Amsterdam — Ambitious Electric Mobility, District Heating, and Circular Economy Goals


By John J. Berger
Aug. 2, 2016
The Huffington Post

Amsterdam, The Netherlands — How did Amsterdam formulate its ambitious climate and energy planning programs, stealing a march on many other cities?

During a wide-ranging interview last fall, Peter Paul Ekker, spokesman for Amsterdam Alderman Abdeluheb Choho, vice mayor for sustainability, described the city’s ambitious sustainability goals and why Amsterdam is so receptive to innovative climate-protection programs.

Ekker explained to me that Amsterdam has had a municipal climate agency since 2006, long before most other cities, and that same year also embarked on its first intensive studies of climate and energy .

Those studies culminated in a 2010 report, Amsterdam: A Different Energy: 2040 Energy Strategy. Over the next four years, the city council and vice-mayors led the city in creating and implementing a clean energy strategy that included goals for energy efficiency, as well as for solar and wind power.

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Sustainable Amsterdam — Mobilizing for A Clean, Prosperous Future


By John J. Berger
Aug. 1, 2016
The Huffington Post

Amsterdam, The Netherlands — Amsterdam has set forth ambitious aspirations to slash its greenhouse gas emissions (GHG). In Amsterdam: A Different Energy: 2040 Energy Strategy (2010), the city outlines its intention to become sustainable by 2040, emitting only a quarter as much GHG as in 1990. If Amsterdam succeeds, its emissions would be 15 percent below the European Union’s 60 percent emissions-reduction goal for 2040.

Municipal officials see the city’s 2040 GHG target as a milestone that must be attained if the city is to reach an 80 to 90 percent reduction in GHG by 2050. City leaders have long recognized, however, that achieving the 2050 goal will be a lengthy process requiring broad cooperation as well as patience and perseverance.

That’s why city officials have made it a practice for almost a decade to reach out to the business sector, government, and civil society groups to build a broad social consensus in favor of the city’s new energy and climate strategy.

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Sustainable Amsterdam — An Ambitious Green Agenda


By John J. Berger
July 29, 2016
The Huffington Post

Amsterdam, The Netherlands — Knowing that a large and increasing share of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions come from cities, and that the world is currently projected to warm 4 degrees Celsius by 2100, if not sooner, it is clearly imperative to reduce cities’ GHG emissions.

Cities account for 71-76 percent of global GHGs and a large fraction of the world’s population will live in cities by 2050. (The Global Commission on the Economy and Climate puts the number at 85 percent; the UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs puts it at two-thirds of the total.)

To get a better understanding of how leading European cities are planning to reduce their GHGs and accommodate to climate change, I traveled to Amsterdam (as well as Rotterdam, Ghent, Copenhagen, and Stockholm) in November 2015 to learn more about their successes and struggles.

Reducing cities’ GHGs to protect the climate may sound like a straightforward, linear process. Just set municipal targets, conduct appropriate studies, create policies, apply them, and watch emissions fall. Amsterdam’s experience as a front-runner in the global race to reduce GHGs, however, reveals that reality is messier.

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